Wisconsin

Madison

  • About

  • History

  • Location

  • Things to do

  • Demographics

  • Culture

  • Schools

  • FAQ

Mobile Home Madison, WI

If there is a city that encapsulates the coexistence of modernity and tradition, none does that better than Madison, WI. It is a place where art and culture buffs troop in droves to marvel at its treasures in museums and be transported into another world by its soulful music. During debates on cities at the forefront of technology, Madison has to feature prominently. Those who have had the privilege of being seduced by its atmosphere speak of its capacity to put you in a trance, leaving you wanting more. It is where those who understand the tender language of love take those they hold dear to their hearts.

If you have long desired to own a mobile home in a city that will enrich your existence, you might want to think of Madison, WI. It is not just a city, it is a sanctuary for those keen on the therapeutic power of splendor.

History

Madison, WI, has a long and rich history that dates back hundreds of years. The land on which the town sits was occupied by Native Americans who built thousands of effigy mounds, earning them the name “mound builders.” Before the white settlers descended upon the area, the Ho-Chunk Nation Indians regarded the area as their ancestral home well into the 1940s. They built their homes around the lakes that populated the vast expanse. James Duane Doty, a former district judge, and land speculator is the founding father of Madison, WI, having committed his resources to acquire huge chunks of land in the area. He had been moving through the isthmus in 1829 when he caught sight of the land and decided to buy it. The land was so appealing to his eye that he could not resist the urge to acquire it. In 1836, the district judge founded the city and had it named after former president James Madison who had died in the summer. The naming was to honor the legacy of the 4th president of the United States. In 1836, Doty made a strong case to the legislature as to why Madison’s status should be elevated to that of a capital city. Legislators found his case compelling and voted in favor of the city becoming the capital of Wisconsin. What’s more, the legislature granted Doty’s request to have a university established there. Businesses and industries started pitching tents in the city in 1850 thanks to the efforts of a wealthy businessman from Milwaukee known as Leonard J. Farwell. A railroad was built in 1854, setting the city up for even greater development. Eight years after Wisconsin was elevated to the status of a state, the population of Madison ballooned to 6, 864. Yankees from the eastern states became the first people to inhabit the place. The Germans, Irish, and Norwegians would follow shortly thereafter. It is until the turn of the 20th century that Italians, Greeks, and Jews arrived. Given its elevated status as a seat of government, Madison has long been the center of Wisconsin’s intellectual and political life. At the height of the civil war that threatened to destroy the union, soldiers trained at Camp Randall. The 20th century ushered in progressive reforms in the city, including the respect for workers’ rights, unemployment insurance, and social security. It is these reforms that earned Madison, WI the reputation of being a liberal state.

Things to do in Madison

Show Up At The Wisconsin State Building
The Wisconsin State Building is not just a building where laws are made and debated. It is an architectural masterpiece that stands proudly in Madison, WI. You don’t have to be an architecture buff to be impressed by its epic design. Finished in 1917, it’s always teeming with excited domestic and international tourists keen on soaking in its jaw-dropping beauty.

You will definitely be amazed by its 284-foot-high dome, ornate marble work, and its murals crafted in German, Italian and French styles.

Indulge Your Passion For Art At Chazen Museum Of Art
On display at the Chazen Museum of Art is a bewildering array of art that includes drawings, paintings, sculptures, and photography. The works of outstanding artists like Shusaku Arakawa, Rodin, and Gainsborough are featured here. Beyond being a remarkable repository of great art, the museum plays host to traveling exhibits and chamber music programs.

Visit The Henry Vilas Zoo
The zoo, founded in 1924 and owned by the city of Madison, is home to different animals from the arctic, savannah, and plains habitats. It also features a zoo made for children to indulge in the splendors of the wild. The children’s zoo is equipped with an electric train, and a carousel to ensure that your kids have an enjoyable outing.

Animals domiciled at the zoo include reticulated giraffes, African lions, and Amur tigers.

Soak In Military History At The Wisconsin Veterans Museum
The museum pulsates with the history of the men and women who fought in the Civil War and Gulf War. On display are the tools that those who participated in the wars used, The paraphernalia is displayed in dramatic fashion with the intention to give visitors a sense of how precarious the times were when the wars were fought.

Unreal mobile homes in Madison, WI

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Map showing Madison

Location

Madison, WI, the second-largest city in Wisconsin, is located in south-central Wisconsin and on an isthmus sandwiched between two lakes: Mendota and Monona in Dane County. Lakes Waubesa and Kegonsa are situated to the southeast, completing what is collectively known as the “Four Lakes.” The city is about 75 miles west of Milwaukee. Madison, WI is characterized by a cold and temperate climate. It experiences a significant amount of precipitation during the year even during its driest month. The annual average temperature is 8.7 degrees Fahrenheit.

Madison demographics

Madison’s cosmopolitan character means that it is home to people from different racial and cultural backgrounds. A census that was done in 2020 put its population at 265, 158, making it the second-largest in Wisconsin by population after Milwaukee. Recording a growth of 0.69% annually, Madison, WI, has posted a 13.7% spike in its population since the last census was done. Averagely, the household income is $87, 055. According to a World Population Review survey, the poverty rate stands at 16.88%. Overall, the median age of Madison, WI, is 31 years; 31.6 years for female persons, and 30.4 years for male persons.

Whites make up the bulk of the population, accounting for 78.59% of the people who reside in Madison, WI. The Asians come a distant second making up 8.95% of the population. African Americans constitute 7.01% of the men and women who reside in the city.

Madison, WI, economy is driven by a huge and thriving technology sector with companies like Google, Epic Systems, American Family Insurance, and Exact Sciences having a footprint there. Even so, the Wisconsin State Government and the University of Wisconsin have had an outsize influence on the city’s economy. As years have gone by, the economy of Madison, WI, has evolved from a government-based economy to one powered by consumers and a vibrant high-tech base.

Arts in Madison

When it comes to a vibrant arts and culture scene, Madison, WI, stands shoulder to shoulder with the best. There’s something for everyone to keep you engaged and free you from the shackles of boredom. Domiciled within its boundaries are an array of historical sites and popular festivals including the Rhythm and Boom celebration, the largest and most engaging fireworks display in the Midwest.

There’s also the Great Taste of the Midwest Beer Festival, described by Forbes Magazine as the second-longest-running event of that nature in North America. When winter comes knocking, sports enthusiasts engage in activities such as ice hockey, ice skating, ice fishing, cross-country skiing, and snow-kiting.

Arts in Madison

When it comes to a vibrant arts and culture scene, Madison, WI, stands shoulder to shoulder with the best. There’s something for everyone to keep you engaged and free you from the shackles of boredom. Domiciled within its boundaries are an array of historical sites and popular festivals including the Rhythm and Boom celebration, the largest and most engaging fireworks display in the Midwest.

There’s also the Great Taste of the Midwest Beer Festival, described by Forbes Magazine as the second-longest-running event of that nature in North America. When winter comes knocking, sports enthusiasts engage in activities such as ice hockey, ice skating, ice fishing, cross-country skiing, and snow-kiting.

Arts in Madison

When it comes to a vibrant arts and culture scene, Madison, WI, stands shoulder to shoulder with the best. There’s something for everyone to keep you engaged and free you from the shackles of boredom. Domiciled within its boundaries are an array of historical sites and popular festivals including the Rhythm and Boom celebration, the largest and most engaging fireworks display in the Midwest.

There’s also the Great Taste of the Midwest Beer Festival, described by Forbes Magazine as the second-longest-running event of that nature in North America. When winter comes knocking, sports enthusiasts engage in activities such as ice hockey, ice skating, ice fishing, cross-country skiing, and snow-kiting.

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Licensed brokerage services provided by:

 

USRealty.com, LLP

USRealty Brokerage Solutions, LLP

USRealty.com Brokerage Solutions LLC (dba USRealty.com)

Abode Technologies, Inc. (dba USRealty.com)

 

Phone: (866) 534-3726

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Ohio office: 5533 Southwyck Boulevard, Suite 101, Toledo, OH 43614

Washington office: 15 N. Naches Ave, Office #14, Yakima, WA 98901

 

Disclosures:

 

Texas Real Estate Commission Information About Brokerage Services

Texas Real Estate Commission Consumer Protection Notice

New York State Fair Housing Regulations Notice

New York State required Standardized Operating Procedure for Purchasers of Real Estate Pursuant to Real Property Law 442-H

 

Information About Brokerage Services

 

By law commissions are negotiable and are not fixed by any state or federal law. Prices are subject to change without notice until orders are placed. Licenses: AL: 000101378, AR: PB00077285, AZ: PA625585000 (USRealty Brokerage Solutions, LLP), CA: 01527504 (Abode Technologies, Inc. dba USREALTY.com), CO: EC.100057478, CT: REB.0792629 dba USREALTY.com, DC: REO98368078, DE: RB-0020070 (USRealty Brokerage Solutions, LLP), FL: PR276107, GA: 59309, IL: 481.011765 (Derek Morgan, Broker: 471.012933), IN: RC51500105, KS: CO00002276, LA: 0912122514 (Loria Hamilton-Field, Broker: 0995690736), MA: 8079, MD: 6339, MI: 6502423008, MO: 2008005393, NC: C20101, NE: 20191146, NJ: 1971103, NM: 19525, NV: 1001436, NY: 10491207568, OH: REC.2015001793, OK: 152818, PA: RB066571, RI: REB.0018596, SC: 96085, TN: 261306, TX: 9000929 (Penelope Willhite, Broker: 237866), VA: 0225243285, WA: 9889 (USRealty Brokerage Solutions, LLP), WV: 004704-00 (David Sweeney, Broker: WVB190300552)

 

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USRealty.com, LLP, USRealty.com Brokerage Solutions LLC and USRealty Brokerage Solutions, LLP are an Equal Opportunity Employer and support the Fair Housing Act.

 

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